Tagged With "Peakvue"

Topic

0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ayaz Ahmed ·
We are facing high vibration an axial Flow Morris Type 54” MPAF pump which is designed for re-circulation of Caustic Liquid. This is an overhung design pump with no bearing support on the Non drive end side and pump is directly installed to elbow of a large pipe. Following are the specifications of equipment Flow: 20,000 m3/ hr. RPM: 242 Driver: 1185rpm, 530 kW Motor Driven through a Gear box and universal coupling Observations:- Highest Vibration at P1H (Pump Inboard Horizontal) of 0.5-0.6...
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Dave Reynolds ·
Can you provide a multiple point waterfall, include HVA directions, at each bearing location on the gearbox and pump, if you can get the motor in there also that would help. 18 points maximum allowed in AMS software Resolution of your data is not sufficient enough to determine what frequencies are present, can you take a set of velocity readings on this machine with a 6000 cpm fmax, 1600 LOR, 4 avgs, 50% overlap. Also collect peakvue with 60,000 fmax, 1600 LOR, 500hz and 1000hz filters, 1...
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ayaz Ahmed ·
First of all sorry for the late response; I could only make to the pump yesterday. Please find below the required information 1. I have attached multiple point waterfall for all the points except Peakvue plots. 2. I have attached different plot for the Pump with better resolution as required. 3. Two readings of Peakvue also attached. 4. Pump was completely replaced with an overhauled one, elbow is part of pipe and we didn’t replaced it. 5. I will take bump test reading in the next shutdown...
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ayaz Ahmed ·
I don't know why I can't attach anything in my reply and how to delete or edit my response
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Dave Reynolds ·
When you reply, in the bottom right corner it shows "add attachment, see below now
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ayaz Ahmed ·
Re-sent with attachments.
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ron Brook ·
Response definitely looks like resonant energy. Have you checked all of the supporting piping connections and supports to ensure they ? I don't suspect a flow condition because the axial direction and vertical directions look OK. Check any supports that would affect horizontal stiffness. Ron Brook
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Ayaz Ahmed ·
In that case the CSI Function of Bump Test "Equipment Running" will be on any help? Actually as discussed earlier and can be seen in the above attachment of Pump general drawing, there is no separate support for the pump, it's just directly bolted to the flange on the elbow. However the suction 86" line which is coming from a Caustic crystallizer must have some supports (which am not very aware of). However as mentioned earlier this problem started after replacing the complete pump in Plant...
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

abdillah al bandari ·
look like, that cavitation problem due to flow recirculation inside of pump. comparing to your waterfall that second peak frequency already exist before overhaul and after overhaul become higher. perhaps you can check operation. i assume pump discharge pressure increasing due to restriction at discharge line that cause pump internal recirculation. Regards, Abdillah
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Re: 0.6 pk IPS High Vibration at Large Axial flow pump

Walt Strong ·
I think your spectral data indicates you have two problems that were more likely caused by maintenance actions of replacing the pump. The first problem is the vibration at essentially one half shaft speed that may be caused by impeller rub condition. My understanding is that this pump design does not have an impeller wear ring like a centrifugal pump. The impeller vane tip clearance is critical, so a rub could occur if the shaft is not correctly centered in the housing. The second vibration...
Topic

G-SE / Peakvue/ Demodulation / spike values applicable for sleeve bearing

SMK -ALBA ·
Dear All, For sleeve bearing condition ; Peakvue ,g SE or spike values are helpful or its only for rolling element bearings. If its consider for sleeve bearing also, means what is the guide value for that. Thanks SMK
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Re: G-SE / Peakvue/ Demodulation / spike values applicable for sleeve bearing

Dave Reynolds ·
https://www.maintenance.org/top...eeve-bearing-peakvue This topic has been discussed in the past, if you use the little magnifying glass in the menu bar, search for peakvue sleeve bearings, and multiple threads are available with possible answers to your question. The above link was taken from that search Dave
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Re: Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

xprmntl1 ·
3-4 times the BPFI or highest fault frequency and or 2XGMF(if gears are present) is usually the determining factor when determining the correct FMAX. CSI recommends a 40.5 order FMAX depending on application, and the HP filter should be equal to or above the FMAX. Say you have a motor turning 1800rpm and the FMAX is set at 40 orders, that gives you an FMAX of 72,000cpm or 1200HZ, you will have to set filter at 2000HZ, or you can lower FMAX some to come closer to the 1000HZ filter by setting...
Topic

Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

Prabhu ·
I wish to start this topic, because I have discussed with many Condition Monitoring people I worked with but Still I'm yet to get a convincing answer. Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis. How to select a filter? What are the criteria to be considered? ( BPFI, RPM, Lubrication type, access to the bearing load zone, ....)? Most software have an option to select the HP filter only for Pkvue analysis I'm not clear how it picks corresponding LP filter for that? If there are more than one high...
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Re: Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

rgf12 ·
In PeakVue the vast majority of the data collection is used with a single high pass filter based on the expected fault frequencies that would be expected to be generated either by the bearings or the gears. Rarely is a low pass filter specified in conjunction with a HP filter (that would be a band pass filter BTW) unless you are looking for a specific fault frequency set that would not generate harmonics of the fault frequencies. I can only think of one case that I have dealt with and that...
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Auto correlate of DC Motor

M.Tahir Abbas ·
Hello! Please find below the snapshot of Auto Correlate of DC Motor DE PeakVue. I'm too confused about the pattern. DC Motor is driving 3 Shaft Gearbox which is then conneted to Roll of Paper Machine via Universal Shaft.
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Re: Auto correlate of DC Motor

Jim.F ·
You might have better data if you use a lower HP Filter. Maybe 500Hz.
Topic

PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and CSI 2140

Alexis Herrera ·
Hi everyone, Have anybody tried to collect PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and the CSI 2140? I have read the specs for the Emerson triaxial sensor A0643TX-EX, where said : "Reduce route collection time up to 50% by simultaneously collecting three axis measurements (horizontal, vertical, axial) — plus PeakVue™ measurements — using one button push on the CSI 2140 four-channel analyzer. " However, I'm not sure if using the triaxial sensors I'm able to collect Standard and PeakVue samples...
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Re: PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and CSI 2140

Beatnik ·
It can probably be done but i wouldn't advice it. The accelerometer on the main axis is much better than the other 2 at high frequencies (10khz freq range instead of 3.5kHZ) and you have less rigidity in those directions. I setup my route to have PeakVue and a high frequency Spectrum/TWF on the main axis and lower frequencies on the 2 other axis.
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Re: PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and CSI 2140

JJF ·
You should be able to assign group & channel pairings in Database Setup.
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Re: PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and CSI 2140

Richard Pratt ·
I agree with Beatnik, Emerson only recommends doing Peakvue on the A channel as the other two orientations have a lower frequency range. That really isn't an issue as they only recommend a single Peakvue reading per bearing.
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Re: Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

neuman ·
Good day friends. I write for the following I am new with the handle of the administrator mode I have versio MHM 4.9 I need to configure a peakvue and I have no idea of the parameters of I should create and set alarm. Someone can enjoy a good love of giving me a guide to create this point of view print with the complete configuration. Exhilarated beforehand. regards
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Re: Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

xprmntl1 ·
Go to your tools in AMS Suite MHM and find your frequency calculations program, youll see a Peakview assistant program in which you can input all of your info and it will suggest a High Pass Filter and will also suggest alarms.
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Re: Filter Selection for Peakvue analysis

neuman ·
Ok I manage the program but in investigations in one case I see that a full band alarm was created and in others I see that it varies the parameters. Is what confucion creates me.
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Re: PeakVue samples using triaxial sensors and CSI 2140

Torptorp ·
In addition to what others have mentioned, think about your Triax Accel A channel having the best response due to the pull of the 2 pole magnet in that axis. You will lose a decent amount of your Peakvue data trying to get it from the B or C channels. We have even experienced some signal difference from our switch over from single axis data acquisition because we are taking either the horizontal or vertical in a different location from the single channel accel on route data. So we have a...
Topic

Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
Case Study : CenterHung Fan ,spherical Roller bearing,1000 Rpm Speed ,lubrication is oil Dominant frequency is 1XTS TWF about to be sinsoidal in vertical direction PeakVue is concerning and when using correlation Factor it showed a periodic peaks as shown below Accelerometer 100mv/g units mm./sec Result is :Bearing is rotating on shaft and excessive wear on shaft. i need your comments. horizotal (Spectrum mm./sec) Vertical Axial correlation Factor
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Re: Case Study

Walt Strong ·
I do not see any images either. Walt
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
sorry i will upload again.
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Hossam 2 ·
Re: Case Study
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Ralph Stewart ·
May just be my system for the reason I can not see the images. Thanks, Ralph
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Hossam 2 ·
here is the fan snapshots ..sorry again
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
Do you have a Peakvue in the vertical direction, since its amplitude is twice as high as the horizontal? The vertical velocity data appears to look as though it might have some 1/2x between 6k and 10k cpm frequency.
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Re: Case Study

Ngo Dinh ·
I wonder whether the ball and inner&outer race was damage. It look like the problem by rubbing with the shrink fit of inner race is not correct on shaft. I think that 4 stages of bearing damage focus on race, ball, cage of bearing. I could be total wrong!
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
Thanks for your reply I will attach the paper which tells the horizontal or axial but didnt stated vertical direction.. The point is that the vibration mostly less in vertical direction and too many times i face a less overall values like 3 and 2 and spectrum shows a dominant 1xts but the bearing turning on shaft specially on shafts repaired by belzona Regards
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
....
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
Actually i never take pkvue at vertical as per emerson recommendation.
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
Thanks. I guess everyone does what they think is best for them. But my theory is, sometimes it might be best to think "outside the box" and not stick to the "cut and dried" opinions of others, who may have never encountered something which you or I may be experiencing at any given time. Thanks and Have a Great Day, Ralph
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
I still need help what is the best way tp monitor the bearings (oil lubricated) as the Gs level is very low as shown and spectrum is tricky Thanks in advance
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
Thanks in advance Hosman 2, I am guessing, when you say, "g's level low", you are still referring to a bearing which is loose on the journal. IMO, there is really not a set procedure for this analysis of a spherical roller (or ball bearing) looseness on the shaft. One must look for harmonics of running speed and sub harmonics 1/2x, 1/3x, 1/4x, etc., which are not always very distinct, especially when using an auto scaled amplitude where there are a few amplitudes present which could result...
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
im so sorry for the late reply but it was my work circumstances. here is the snapshot please tell me if this is the required snapshot or not Thanks for help
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
im so sorry for the late reply but it was my work circumstances. here is the snapshot please tell me if this is the required snapshot or not Thanks for help Thanks Hossam. See the attached image where I have peaks marked red and green. I would like for you to measure the RED , using the "set mark" function near the center of area and sideband cursors off the set mark and see if the RED are equally spaced at the true running speed (possibly the true speed is slightly less than the spectrum...
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Re: Case Study

Akhil Rathore ·
What was the trend of velocity & peakvu Was it high & later on reduced without any maintenance ? This must be a taper bore bearing which sits on a taper sleeve with a lock nut & washer When the bearing is mounted the nut is locked with washer Did you see the locking when bearing was opened?
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
this peaks are separated by the running speed of the fan 998 cpm
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
Thanks Hossam. Are the peaks I have marked in RED also equally spaced at a frequency equal to running, as are the ones you have marked with the dotted lines labeled "A"? If the ones marked by the RED "X" are also separated by a frequency equal to running speed, that would make them also one half of running speed, which, IMO, is a good indication there is looseness between the journal and the inner race (or the sleeve and the journal, if the bearing is of the tapered bore type.) Only my...
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
Re: Case Study
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Ralph Stewart ·
Re: Case Study
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Hossam 2 ·
yes the are equally spaced too by the running speed and the difference between the marked A and Red X at is about half the running speed but my question is how could this be a early warning but the actual situation is that a worn shaft under bearing about 0.2 mm the second question what is the reference that i should call it a looseness as the G level is low and why did you choosed this band from 6000 to 11000 cpm at a previous comment thanks
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Re: Case Study

Hossam 2 ·
MHM(Machinery Health manager) Version 5.6
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Re: Case Study

Ralph Stewart ·
Hossam, What version of Emerson software do you run? Ralph
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Balbi ·
One suggestion for next time, If you create a database and copy the equipment and data of concerned to that copy, you can then zip that database and post it and every one that downloads it can then analyze. See sample attachment. It shows a crack inner race on a brand new (dropped during installation press roll) on a paper Machine.
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