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You could just use SKF with similar bearing designators. There isn't much difference between the two in my experience. Even if you're out by one rolling element, the difference in generated frequencies is marginal. But I would agree that having a specific manufacturer's frequencies is preferred. If you're stuck you can use this simple formula as well:

60% number of rolling elements X rpm = BPIR
40% number of rolling elements X rpm = BPOR

9 balls X 60% = 5.4 X 1800 = 9720 cpm (BPIR)

It is suprisingly close. In fact check this out against your data base frequency generator.
When using Medias, it is easier to enter the bearing number in the search box then to go through the menus to find it.

http://medias.ina.de/medias/ext/hp?lang=en

This link will bring you to the Medias home page, the search box is on the upper right corner. If you want to seach by bearing type, select the bearing type on the left hand side and it will expand to further menus. Once you find the bearing you are interested in, you need to select calculations from the choices above the bearing data and then select the symbol that looks like a time waveform.

I know this is a lot of work to get what you need, we are working on putting in a much better system on the F'IS webpage, www.fisna.com

Mike Bensema
FAG Industrial Services
quote:
Originally posted by mbensema:
When using Medias, it is easier to enter the bearing number in the search box then to go through the menus to find it.

http://medias.ina.de/medias/ext/hp?lang=en

This link will bring you to the Medias home page, the search box is on the upper right corner. If you want to seach by bearing type, select the bearing type on the left hand side and it will expand to further menus. Once you find the bearing you are interested in, you need to select calculations from the choices above the bearing data and then select the symbol that looks like a time waveform.

I know this is a lot of work to get what you need, we are working on putting in a much better system on the F'IS webpage, www.fisna.com

Mike Bensema
FAG Industrial Services


Mike,

I'm looking for data or a drawing for a FAG 24124ES, and found this post; it's not in medias and the fisna.com link has expired, has the effort on the "better system" moved to a different address?
I'm no longer at FAG, I did some digging and it appears they are renaming the industrial services group to Schaeffler Industrial Aftermarket. There is a link on the home page of Schaeffler, but it is still under construction and they let the old site expire before the new one is working.

http://www.schaeffler-industri...iam.de/en/index.html


I found the 24124-E1 in Medias, that should be the same dimensions as what you have, the E1 is a newer version of the E improvements and the S only means it has a groove and holes for lubrication on the outer ring.

http://medias.ina.de/medias/en...bU-Xhi3YhUP6?clrsb=1
Hi Alfonso (and everyone else)

I think this might be what you are looking for.

http://www.fis-services.de/sit...earing_Database.html

On the right side under "tools" you'll find "Bearing Database".

If you can't find the bearing you are looking for you'll need to contact Schaeffler / FAG / INA / FIS.

I find the above link is much better than the SKF website (the one you show above) because it lists some brands other than FAG. SKF on the other hand (last time I looked) only have SKF bearings. Must be a marketing ploy to try and make people think they are the only one... rgds
Last edited by Registered Member
After looking at about 200 specific defect frequencies for numerous makes and models of various wind turbine gearbox bearings, I feel justified in shouting out loud ...

"WHY DON'T THESE ENGINEERING GROUPS AND OEM SITES LIST THE FREQUENCY IN ORDERS RATHER THAN IN HERTZ!!!!"

ARRRGGGG! It's should be so simple! Listing by orders is irrespective of speed, but Hz isn't!!
You'd think it would be a no-brainer!

Or is it just me??

Thanks for listening to my rant...
Hi MrVibeman,

I feel your pain. From time to time I have spruiked the benefits of orders. I was lucky enough to be taught that way from the beginning. Others start with Hz (or worse still CPM) and they never manage to see the light after that. (sorry for opening this can of worms again as I am sure it will) They probably will all be doing a decent job but that is not the point - orders simplifies things a great deal since as you say it is independent of speed and I think we need all the efficiency we can get in the work we do.

I worked for a large bearing OEM for some years and the organisation was that large that at least I am of the opinion that these frequency calculators are not built by practical troops on the ground but high level prgrammers and engineers / mathemeticians who haven't actually performed the task of vibration analysis and is why the very practical idea of orders is usually an after thought, if not lost altogether. And then off course the majority of machines are fixed speed so maybe it is majority rules. rgds

BTW MrVibeman. You do know that if you enter speed as 1 then the results will show the numbers equivalent to orders in the Hz centric frequency calculators.
Thanks VR,
Yeah, I know the cpm=1 trick; it's just a hassel to change everything when they could apply a calculator to the site like SKF does. (let's you choose Hz, CPM, or Orders with the click of a button)

My real problem is with the engineering groups (like you mentioned) that supply a spreadsheet with every bearing in 3 different gearboxes (which took them 6 months to get to me), and all the fault frequencies are listed, but in Hz, and the machines are variable speed! and to make matters worse, they don't list the reference speed.
My hair would be gray if I wasn't already pulling it out....
quote:
Originally posted by MrVIBEMAN:
Btw, the FIS-services bearing database link that you provided in March doesn't work. Well, the link works, but when you click on 'Bearing Database' it just brings up an error.

Do you have to be logged in for it to work? If so, I didn't see a registration link anywhere.


Just tried that database both in Internet Explorer and Firefox and worked in both. Confused
quote:
Originally posted by MrVIBEMAN:
My real problem is with the engineering groups (like you mentioned) that supply a spreadsheet with every bearing in 3 different gearboxes (which took them 6 months to get to me), and all the fault frequencies are listed, but in Hz, and the machines are variable speed! and to make matters worse, they don't list the reference speed.
My hair would be gray if I wasn't already pulling it out....


The ref speed would be the standard motor speed. I know the OEM's of gearboxes are not reknowned for their vibration skills and they reluctantly include this info. I am tracking a gearbox bearing fault in a big box at the moment and my client insisted I got in touch with the OEM - presumably they trusted them more than me. I did that and all I got back was a very short comment refering to overall vibration levels mm/s rms and that vibration was not that high whilst my diagnosis was based on comprehensive frequency analysis with bearing freqs picked out and surveys over more than 12 months. Just because they are OEM doesn't necessarily mean that they are expert on all aspects of the product. rgds
quote:
Originally posted by MrVIBEMAN:
Btw, the FIS-services bearing database link that you provided in March doesn't work. Well, the link works, but when you click on 'Bearing Database' it just brings up an error.

Do you have to be logged in for it to work? If so, I didn't see a registration link anywhere.


Worked for me as of yesterday. It is a very good database.
I had found in the past though that when I had that link stored in my internet explorer favourites it would not work but it has worked when I have entered through www.fag.de everytime.
VR, it's not a motor, it's a wind driven variable speed generator, hence the need for a reference speed.

Sinski, I was referring to the Fis-services link that VR posted in March. I've used the FAG calculator many times and it's great, but I'm looking for INA and NSK bearing frequencies now and can't seem to find a database or calculator for them.

Thx,
Gary
MrVibeman

I should have clarified myself. If you enter the FAG website through www.fag.de all of there linked websites are in a drop down list in the top right hand corner of the site. From that list you can choose Fis services which takes you to that website. I have had error trouble directly entering their web address but have had no problem entering the Fis website via the FAG website.

The Fis database also has INA and NSK bearings. NSK also have a bearing database on their own website if the Fis one does not have what you are looking for.
quote:
Originally posted by MrVIBEMAN:
VR, it's not a motor, it's a wind driven variable speed generator, hence the need for a reference speed.
/QUOTE]

Understand now. You will have your hands full. What make is the machine? How many MW?

[QUOTE]Sinski, I was referring to the Fis-services link that VR posted in Thx,
Gary


I just clicked on the link I posted and worked for me.
Thanks VR, for some reason that worked fine for me too. Not sure why it wouldn't let me in the other way.

Btw, that particular wind turbine is a GE 1.5 MW.

3 different gearboxes from turbine to turbine, all with different make and model bearings on just about every shaft.

A bunch of the frequencies I was given are incorrect, so I'm trying to verify them all, but many of the bearings listed are either labeled incorrectly, don't exist, or are so top-secret that the OEM's don't list them in their bearing databases. Roll Eyes

Thanks for your help though!
Hello Alfonso-
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