Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

mineral oils may have a density of say somewhere between 0.85 and 0.95 kg/l, depending on their composition. more viscous oils tend to have a higher density.

that you find a discrepancy between the values in the manufacturers spec and what a lab reports is not unusual, because there can be several reasons for that. to start with: the value that is documented in sales literature not necessarily is measured on the oil delivered to you. it may well be measured several years ago, either as a one off measurement or calculated as a average value based on several measurements of various batches. in product literature the usual phrasing most times is something alike "average/typical values that may be expected".

the value you get from a lab is a real measurement from the sample you supplied - depending on the type of analysis carried out it may well be a average as well because in a lot of standards it is stipulated that the measurement should be carried out several times to reduce the risk of errors due to reproducibility.

a third variation may well be due to the blending accuracy in the lubricant plant. when you want to mix a ISO 220 gear oil for example, the viscosity at 40 degrees C should be between 198 and 242 mm2/s - the nominal value of 220 plus or minus 10%. for normal lubrication requirements that is more then sufficiently close, but when the density would be measured from the extremes that are within the spec the densities will differ.
RM

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×