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Hi all,

Summer is approaching fast. We are here in the Middle East; our rotating machines experience one of the most severe temperatures approaching sometimes +52 degrees Celcius. Some of our Compressors and Pumps suffer high lube oil temperature related trips. There may be several other reasons for it, however we are looking for making trial by using friction reducer additives into our lubricants.

Could anyone share their experience about friction reducers? Doesn't it change the physical property of the host lubricant? How often it need to be added? Pros and Cons ??

Regards,
Mohammad

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In this respect you are 100% right. In the cases that go into alarm synthetic would help and possibly oil mist would be the best one. I'm not familiar with any friction reducers for industrial applications. Talking to lubrication engineers from the major oil companies they always were warning about adding anything to existing industrial oils as another issues can be created. You have to be very careful.
RM
Oil Mist can only be used for the antifriction bearings. In case of journal / thurst bearings, oil mist is not applicable.
I would agree that addition of any performance improvement additive (friction reducer) into the existing lubricant is a very sensitive issue. Generally, the additive manufacturers recommend certain %age of quantity of additive, and this should not be exceeded, in order to keep the properties of host lubricant un-altered.
However, this technique for lubricant performance improvement is not new and has been proven on various machine types.
RM
I am not expert lubrication guy but here are my thoughts ....

I recently installed lubricating oil system which has operating conditions similar to yours. This lubricating system has a water modulating valve at the outlet of the heat exchanger unit. What this WMV does is that it allows more flow of water through the heat exchanger unit during summer. This keeps the bearing temperature same regardless of summer or winter. What changes is flow of water through the heat exchanger unit.

By installing this system your problem / issues can be resolved.
RM
Thanks Riyaz for the response.
Regarding the lube oil cooling systems, still it has limitations. Most of our turbo machines are having fin fan type lube oil coolers which run on their limit during the summers due to high ambient temps.

I have come across recommendations regarding Belesta LC2 (A Belzona Product) which is friction reducer additive, claiming to resolve our problems.
Visit the webpage http://belesta.com/

Could anyone having experience with Belesta LC2 share their experience?

Regards,
Mohammad
RM
As this post was intended for friction reducer, I just wanted to say that I'm using "Champion QX" everywhere I can. I didnt really believe all the story I heard about it, until I put it in my 2009 Toyota Sienna. Now making 760km instead of 620km with a full tank. There's many other story on the site, that I think are true.

I guess this product is sold to US too. The site is the Canadian version but you can certainly find one for the US.

http://www.championqxecanada.com/
RM
Valve,

Read your response today after a long time.

First of all, we already considered lube cooling system during the design phase but still there are few cases when we suffer higher lube temperatures during summers.

You might have been trying the suggestion which you gave to shower cooling water on the cooler, however this not the permanent and technical solution.

We were looking for the real solution to the problem. And last year we already resolved the issue by doing pre summer preparation activities and replacing the mineral lube with synthetic (having higher thermal stability and better film strength).

Regards

Mohammad
RM
New to this forum and looks like this is an older post, but have you checked out http://www.prolubeonline.com ?  Their product MetalGuard almost reduces friction to 0%.Originally Posted by Mohammad CMRP, MLA1:
Synthetic Oils are not the solution for every case. May be for small quantity sump it might be practical. However for the bulk oil reservoirs with capacity 12000 liters its not wise to use synthetics. Instead, there are other opportunities like using friction reducer additives available in the market.

 

RM
Thank you for letting me know about this.  I read the disclosures and did not find anything like that. However I also did not want to come across as a pure sales pitch.  We do want feedback from companies using our product.  Is there a specific place to discuss products?  We only want to do things that are appropriate! Michael A. Whitaker, CLTC    440-915-5570  Direct Line
Premier Solutions Group. LLC - Protecting Your Future, Today!





On Friday, August 28, 2015 1:23 PM, AMP - Asset Management Professionals <alerts@hoop.la> wrote:


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| Subject: Summer improvements: Friction reducers in Lubricants Reply By: Reliability In: Asset Condition Management / Posts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis | |

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RM

I have made this statement before...based on almost 20 years of direct gear related experience and another 25 years of general machinery experience, in all honesty, I have never seen drastic temperature reductions or indication of friction reduction due solely to a lubricant change. When changes like the often stated claims do occur and the instance is properly investigated there is often also some other underlying contributing factor that is corrected in the process of the oil change. Very often the original oil was incorrect, the oil level was incorrect, the change involved going from a much degraded mineral based product to a synthetic...lots of possibilities.  IMO, properly selected lubricants are about as good as they can be, so look elsewhere for those "magic" improvements.  What is important is machinery knowledge and how the machine design can affect the lubricant selection.

RM

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