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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
need some help
Registered Member go to the Noria website and there is a wealth of information there to get you started. They have training available also. Insight Oil services has a short book- "Oil Analysis for Dummies" that gives a good overview of the program fundementals [ more ]
Registered Member thanks a lot rgf12,do you have a files or course about oil analysis please i'm new at this domain? [ more ]
Registered Member Okay-its the ISO Particle count-> 4 microns> 6 microns>14 microns [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Mobil DTE 724 turbine Oil
Registered Member The 932 product is, from what I know, a good product and would be my choice as a replacement oil. We have 4 simple cycle CTs still running the 724 product and I'm seeing an additve dropout issue that clogs filters and servos just as effectively as varnish does on only one of the machines. I have heard from others in the industry and from my analysis lab that this seems to be a random occurance and I was hoping someone on this board could share any simalar experiences. [ more ]
Registered Member I believe Mobil recommends Mobil DTE 932 GT oil as of about 3 to 4 years ago for the GE Frame 3, 5, 6, 7 and 9 turbines. The DTE 932 was a replacement of the DTE 724. I would suggest you read the article at http://www.power-eng.com/artic...or-gas-turbines.html but contact GE for the best recommendation. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Static electricity at oil dispersal point
Registered Member Is there a way to check for this and recognize when it is occurring? [ more ]
Registered Member Static build up in filters is quite a well documented issue. I would imagine that suitable grounding will help but you may also need to look at the filter system in use. Static discharge through the oil will lead to cracking of the oil i.e. thermal degradation [ more ]
Registered Member it is, see http://www.stle.org/resources/...etails.aspx?did=1428 the type of filter used may well have a large influence on both the amount of static that is generated and whether the amount of static can be decreased. grounding the filtering equipment may reduce the damage done due to local discharge but will not prevent "charged oil" to enter into machinery and maybe cause some damage there to both oil and equipment. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Aeration in Pump Bearing Housing
Registered Member you are talking about aeration. aeration to me means bubbles in the oil, whereas bubbles on top of the oil as you describe them is called "foam" in my book. you can compare foaming yo the head on a good glass beer, where aeration is more like the bubbles in a glass of coke. although air is involved in both situations, what actually happens is quite different. air in the oil is just what is says - air bubbles that travel upward in the oil with a certain speed, depending on the viscosity of... [ more ]
Registered Member Does the condition occur at one bearing housing or both? Do you have a drawing available to post? If not it would be helpful to understand the lub method.. * Is there an oil ring? (if so, is it possible to observe oil ring operation to see if it is smooth or erratic.) * any other oil pumping/moving device in the reservoir? * What is oil level relative to the rolling elements? If you are suspecting contamination (sometimes it is difficult to flush), you can easily try a home-made foaming test... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Raymond Pulverizer Coal Mills
Registered Member There is a helix pump at the bottom of the main shaft that pushes oil up to the top bearing. I have seen these clog with brass shards from the driven gear. [ more ]
Registered Member With what has happened to our coal mining businesses and coal fired power plants gonzo probably doesn't have a job now to reply from D [ more ]
Registered Member Wow! This thread started in 2007, only the last two additions are current. Yet it has been viewed almost 5500 times. Must be a lot of interest in Raymond coal mills! [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Engine Oil Analysis
Registered Member Most likely it was a "crackle test" since the detection limit is about 0.1%. That may be detected within a fully qualified lab in accordance with a known standard, or you can do it yourself by dipping a woodchip in the oil and then try to light the oil covered end of it. If it crackles there is moisture present: 0.1% or more. [ more ]
Registered Member What was the test method for moisture content? The result being below 1000 PPM would rule out FTIR which leaves KF or crackle test. Recommended reading is Oil Analysis Basics (Fitch and Troyer), downloadable as an Ebook/PDF. Cheers. [ more ]
Registered Member At my last job (power plant) we had some Emergency Diesel Generators and a diesel driven firewater pump. Our external oil lab performed a "crackle test" and reported the water content as < 0.10% or > 0.10% by volume. The Operating & Maintenance Instructions from either of the engine vendors (EMD and Cummins) did not have any water content acceptance values specified. We did not do any particle counting either (optical counting will not work with dark engine oil). I recommend... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
bearing corrosion and oil content is zero
Registered Member 3adli, With the information you supplied and the pictures, it "may" be possible that you have indications of fretting corrosion. Hard to be definitive without actually seeing the details. Do all the rollers show the same markings? What does the outer race show? [ more ]
Registered Member to me it looks like water might be the cause of the damage. the fact that no water was found in a luboil sample not necessarily means there was no water present or has not been present for a while within the bearing. if the bearing was stored within a rather moist atmosphere condensation may have taken place and may have caused corrosion. are you certain that when the bearings were installed after the storage they were in good condition? [ more ]
Registered Member yes the vibration analyst report for Very high FT frequency and multiples bearing in spectra with high bed energy, Clear impacting/ knocking in free end bearing in time waveform also high G's, i attach another pic and yes some rollers have an axial marks i think they appear in the pic attached [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
greasing - minimum clearance
Registered Member Grease will flow within that small space. There won't be much but it doesn't take much either. However it can be sensitive to upset condition. Does the bushing have distribution grooves? Are the temperatures stable? What is the consistency of the grease, and is it the OEM recommendation? Also with that small clearance, it will be sensitive to edge loading due to misalignment. Has the alignment of the rotating element been confirmed? David [ more ]
Registered Member If it's on a "Farval" type system with the one or two way pistons delivering grease, I would certainly look at those valves and ensure they are pumping grease when expected to (and that grease is actually getting to the end of the line where it enters the sleeve). Those are the Achilles heel in most of those type systems. D [ more ]
Registered Member Thanks for the response Dave. Apologies for my delay in replying but I have been on holiday. This valve is greased as part of our turbine greasway system via an automatic grease pump timed to grease these valves every 16 hours I believe. Will have to get back to you on what pressures this operates at. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Semi fluid grease
Registered Member Semi-fluid means an oil with soap thickener that results in a fluid between grease and oil. There is a wide range of properties between grease and oil so it's hard to generalize much. Semi-fluids are helpful when the lubricant must flow more than grease but oil leaks too much. There is another kind of lubricant I've seen called semi-fluid - this was a food grade gear oil with a highly viscous EP additive package. The EP additives were formulated for performance but the semi-fluid properties... [ more ]
Registered Member semifluid greases are often used in (small) gearboxes that are not oiltight and where the loading is such that heat dissipation is not much of a issue. the semifluid grease has a composition just like other greases: a thickener, a basefluid and often some additives. the term "semifluid" is somewhat misleading - although the "semifluid grease" has a high penetration value it is nonetheless a grease which means that the flow properties differ substantially from a "real" fluid. [ more ]
Registered Member The only time I have seen a semi fluid grease used in a gearbox was a service type that included an operating environment that was quite hot. In a steel mill for instance it is not unusual to see specialized machinery in an environment that could approach process temperatures. These temperatures are often 250ºF to 300ºF (120ºC to 150ºC). At normal room temperature these greases are semi-solid but at the operating temperatures become liquid. Do some research by looking up "drop point". [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Constant Oiler for vertical submersible pump selection
Registered Member I agree it looks like the vent on the left accomplishes nothing different than the vent on top of the oil level indicator. However since they both appear to be connected below the oil level of the reservoir, neither one of them would effectively vent the air space above the reservoir. A vent connected below the oil level can't really do it's intended job so you may have potential for vacuum to be drawn above the oil which can cause overfeeding from the oiler to the reservoir. I would look at... [ more ]
Registered Member Thanks for the info RSI_TP & Grease Monkey, RSI_TP, It's the original one not replaced with after market part, Though Client is planning- Grease Monkey, I will try this an see what will be the outcome. [ more ]
Registered Member In my opinion I would first remove the air filter for the oil fill pipe ( the cap that's on top of the pipe on the left in the pic.) and replace it with a plug. I don't believe there is a need for it since the oil level tube already has a small vent hole near the top of it. I believe it may be allowing too much air to vent not causeing the slight vacuum that is needed for the trico oiler to work properly and allowing the oil to flow freely out of the oiler. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Oil Viscosity Change
Registered Member hello rgf12: i try to understand your issue,gear oil 's viscosity(320) drop and you could add new oil with high viscosity(460) to balance it. is my comprehending correct? [ more ]
Registered Member See table 5 here http://machinerylubrication.co...4/oil-analysis-tests [ more ]
Registered Member We have a similar issue with a PG320. The problem happens in most of the gearboxes we use it. We keep getting sample reports with VG reduction down to about 260-280. We had a go at adding 460 to bring it back up but only with guessing the amount. These machines have been running for 10 years. Due to group procurement agreements we have to use oil from a certain company. With the two previous companies we used there was no such issue with VG changes. Any thoughts on what could cause these VG ... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
oil density
Registered Member tanks a lot dears bur how about synthetic specially refrigerant oil? if we have a 0.2 different in density between data sheet and lab report for fresh oil is it acceptable?.which astm code refer to specification of refrigerant oils. best regard [ more ]
Registered Member mineral oils may have a density of say somewhere between 0.85 and 0.95 kg/l, depending on their composition. more viscous oils tend to have a higher density. that you find a discrepancy between the values in the manufacturers spec and what a lab reports is not unusual, because there can be several reasons for that. to start with: the value that is documented in sales literature not necessarily is measured on the oil delivered to you. it may well be measured several years ago, either as a one... [ more ]
Registered Member I would suggest you deal with your lab as to what may be acceptable. You could also find limits in ASTM D4304 available at http://www.astm.org/Standards/D4304.htm . [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Air Compressor Oil change
Registered Member I would contact Compair for the manual as John suggested. Do you have any oil analysis data or is this a time based change? Are there any indications of varnishing? If so you might want to do a flush before the change. If it is an older machine off warranty you can save yourself many $$$$ by going to an aftermarket lubricant. All of the compressor OEMs sell a very expensive "special" lubricant for their machines. Most often they buy a PAG or some other oil in bulk, repackage it, slap their... [ more ]
Registered Member That looks to be a very small packaged unit. Have you checked the manual or asked the OEM for advice? [ more ]
Registered Member Rgf12, I would like to follow up this post of mine. Thanks, Darwin [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Grease Interval and Replenishment Qty Spreadsheet
Registered Member Thanks Col [ more ]
Registered Member John, SKF have some freebees that are well worth a look. Firstly there is a database that allows set-up of all lube points with selection and calculations built in; http://www.skf.com/group/produ...n-planner/index.html For iPhone and Android Apps, search on SKF Bearing Calculator. A calculator is available on-line at; http://www.skf.com/group/produ...f-dialset/index.html If you need any assistance, I'm only a stone throw away; call me on 0419947286 Regards Col [ more ]
Registered Member http://www.lubcon.com/en/site/3860/app-store check this apps you can calculate the lube interval and volume just enter the bearing designation [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Trending Grease samples from low speed Bearings
Registered Member I have to agree with my friend Danny here. I've tried it two or three times and never got anything repeatable even when I sent in samples that I had taken at same time but different area on bearing (Lime Kiln once and brick oven once). We did develop what we thought was a good check on the brick oven using an ultrasonic gun and just listening to the bearing. Couldn't develop a trend with db, but felt our ears were doing well with it. D [ more ]
Registered Member Hi Romke, I understand the difficulties with trying to trend grease results the environment is extremely dusty so trying to prevent contamination would be almost impossible. Vibration is not an option due to be slow speed, however temperature could be viable. [ more ]
Registered Member sampling and analyzing grease is quite difficult because it will be difficult to sample (you do want a part of the grease that actually has been used in the bearing itself and has not been stationary within a cavity) and analyzing the grease after sampling also is quite difficult and of a very limited nature. the cost of obtaining and analyzing a sample also can be prohibitive. personally i would not try to do a kind of trend analysis, because it is near impossible to get any meaningful... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
tost test
Registered Member the TOST test uses a kind of useful life test for turbine oils (that usually do not contain a oxidation inhibitor or antiwear additives), the test is therefore unsuitable for hydraulic oils or gear oils. gear oils and hydraulic oils can vary quite a bit in performance, depending on basefluids and additives used. the performance can to a certain extend be judged based on the FZG test and various tests as required by hydraulic equipment manufacturers. most suppliers can supply a range of... [ more ]
Registered Member Most of the major oil suppliers can give you an comprehencsive lubrication selection recommendation from their various products based on your needs. Try to make a connection with their lubricant engineer or technical group as opposed to dealing with a local salesman/distriutor. I would start with the OEM recommendations and make an application list and have the prospective suppliers submit their recomendations for each application with costs per gallon and a detailed spec sheet showing... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Bearing
Registered Member I have also searched internet using INA 6005 RS Ah26 but resulted in no exact match. [ more ]
Registered Member Should you store spare INA bearings with a min/max level then? Have you analysed the cash flow for the 3 scenarios using INA, FAG and SKF bearings? [ more ]
Registered Member yes INA and FAG are same company but we used the FAG bearing with the box of red and INA is green, we cannot buy the specs of INA that came from the OEM so it is sure that this is special bearing for this application. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Abrupt change in viscosity and falsh point after oil change
Registered Member Spherical, viscosity drop along with flash point drop, for me it look like contaminant was entering your lubrication system. Either it in the form of GAS or LIQUID Did you got any un-familiar smell in the oil sample? Regards, [ more ]
Registered Member I think electripete was asking, YES Pete the oil after 1 month from Oil change came down to 26cst at 40C while the low limit is 56cst and flash point low limit is 150C. John, honestly conclusion is not yet arrive so we decided to change the oil as it is not healthy to run at very low viscosity and low flash point is also a safety risk. Oil sample will be taken after a day of running and after a month to verify this symptom. Tank breather and venturi air supply presure will also be adjusted. [ more ]
Registered Member I would have to know a great deal more about your system to express an opinion. For instance, one question I would have would be how would this issue explain the change in flash point? [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
cross referance
Registered Member Not sure what you want based on the original question. There is a chart at http://www.graco.com/content/d...40580/340580EN-A.pdf that lists several types of grease, with Shell Products included in the listing, as well as many others commonly available in the USA. By the way, the chart I reference was found by using Google and the simple search terms "shell grease cross reference". There may be a lot more info out there suitable to your needs so let Google be your friend! [ more ]
Registered Member it depend of what is the technical data of Shell grease you want to replaced, check the base oil and thickener so that you have the basis when you change the grease. Sometimes there is a case they replaced the old grease and the basis is the technical data of old grease but the problem still occurred what they found out that the old grease is not compatible with the application. You have to consider the temperature, speed, load and so on. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Lubrication Selection Form
Registered Member Thanks for the input John. [ more ]
Registered Member Acceptability is more about whether this meets your needs, not what we think about it. Keep in mind as well the form should change over time as you learn about other parameters of interest; perhaps an entry for food grade or non-food grade. Is this all about chain lubrication by the way; something not even mentioned until you posted the draft form? If it is just chain lubrication then you might want to incorporate some of the considerations discussed at... [ more ]
Registered Member Hello guys, upon my researched online and asked some friend I created a selection form, in the attached file please check if this is acceptable any comment is appreciated. Best regards, Darwinred [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Grease alternatives chart
Registered Member http://www.graco.com/content/d...40580/340580EN-A.pdf A short listing from Graco Lubricators. When in doubt test compatibility. [ more ]
Registered Member the grease you mention seems to be based on a polyurea type of thickener. those greases are known for their wide temperature operating range and long useful life under high temperatures. their composition is quite different from the more standard lithium based greases that are widely used. no doubt other grease manufacturers will be able to supply a comparable type of grease that could do the job just as well. but mixing these types of grease may lead to problems and is better avoided. if... [ more ]
Registered Member if you are looking for alternative check the technical data of chevron you will find the base oil and thickener and so on, then you can find the alternative using this data. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
solest 370
Registered Member Or can you do this way, Take a fresh oil sample, and test it (as said by John) Then when the result come, send it to: smobest@statoil.com (as mentioned in the product data sheet), to take his advice whether the oil test result is acceptable or not. I am using CP Solest 120; CP Solest 100; and some other refrigeration compressor lubricant. Usually the ICP result are showing less additive [Na, Ba, Ca, Mg, Zn, P, and Mo](< 10 ppm / negligible if we consider the lab test reproduceability) ... [ more ]
Registered Member A regular oil analysis (spectrograph) will give what he is wanting. I think he's just wanting someone who uses the oil already, and has sent in a sample to tell him what the additive content is that showed up on their report. D [ more ]
Registered Member You are not likely to learn the properties you desire. Even the MSDS sheet states "Proprietary Formulation". What can be done, when you send in oil for testing, send in a small quantity of new oil of the exact same type to be tested and hence become a baseline reference. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
phosphor in oil
Registered Member Dear Gary * I am agree with John, that "the use of an EP lubricant with a sulfur-phosphorus additive package is not advised in the presence of "yellow" metals" * 4274 ppm of Phospor for me is too high * The jump from 365 to 4274 may be due to: > as you wrote, incorrect oil top up > or it may due to the solubility of EP additive in your oil is not good, and tend to setle down in the bottom of the gearbox reservoir. I was experiecing the setlement of black and sticky layer, on the bottom... [ more ]
Registered Member The phosphorus itself should not be a wear metal of a bronze gear used in a worm gear setup. However, the use of an EP lubricant with a sulfur-phosphorus additive package is not advised in the presence of "yellow" metals, which means bronze. The main reason is these addivites can be quite corrosive at temperatures that are around 50°C (122°F to 60°C (140°C). These are not unusually high temperatures for most worm gear applications and hence the reason why most worm gear manufacturers in the... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
phosphorus higher in sump than in new oil
Registered Member Hello Shanos, We have detected "elvating" levels of phosphorous in Shell Turbo T46 through submicron particle analysis from 50nm to 2 microns....steam turbine driven. The root cause was cross contamination leak from EHC fluid. More than happy to assist. Cheers. [ more ]
Registered Member Hello Electricpete, Did you ever solve your problem with high Phosphorous in your lube oil? I've been having a similar problem with my turbine oils and the one common factor with the units that have been affected is that water contamination existed. At first I thought that maybe the use of a vacuum dehydrator had some effect on it (heat affecting the chemical composition of the lube oil causing Phosphorous to drop out of solution [if that's even possible] or even possibly contamination from... [ more ]
Registered Member Sound like it's the new oil problem. Have you contacted your oil supplier? They should know their oil characteristics fully whether it's emulsifying or chemical raction etc.... Has the oil brand or specs changed in the 2005 whole sump change? [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Oil Filtration Systems
Registered Member Dear All, these blowers, called extractor fans, are used to remove air and hence creating a negative pressure (vacuum) inside the bearing housing to prevent oil leakage. whereas oil purifiers are used to dismantle water and purify the oil. they have different functions. [ more ]
Registered Member Decision made to purchase mass transfer vacuum dehydrator unit for our turbine oil purification. Thanks Bould173 for your comments. [ more ]
Registered Member I visited another power plant recently that used Bowsers. They put small roots blower on the reservoir top to pull the moist air from the head space. They have been doing this for years. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Mobil 629 vs 630 or 634
Registered Member The 220 will be too thick and you may run the risk of starving part of the mechanism of lubrication Play it safe and use the right lubricant. [ more ]
Registered Member The Drill is quite old but I believe it called out Mobile 629. The building never drops below 20 degrees, so temp it not an issue. Other than the ISO, theres not much diference looking at the specs of both oils. [ more ]
Registered Member I would check with the OEM of the drill but if that isn't possible then address the issue of what the environment might mean to the choice of lubricant. If for instance the machine is used in an unheated area and subject to your cold temperatures, then the 634 should definitly be ruled out but as you point out the 629 and 630 are very similar. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Lube Oil Type interchange
Registered Member Use Google and search for a paper titled SLEEVE BEARING DESIGN FOR SLOW SPEED APPLICATIONS IN CEMENT PLANT. It's a PDF but of note is recommendation #1 on page 7 which essentially says not to change lubricants without checking to with the OEM. [ more ]
Registered Member I would do an evaluation of the 2 oils viscosity at the expected operating temperature ranges and compare additive packages. Most sleeve (journal) bearing will do fine with 32 weight turbine oil. What are the motor details? [ more ]
Registered Member the oil you have is a bit more viscous (32 vs 22 mm2/s at 40 deg C). it may be quite possible to use the thicker oil, but there are two things to watch out for. one is a higher operating temperature, because of the thicker oil, another is a difference in oil supply because of the change of viscosity, which may also lead to higher operating temperature. so, after changeover, watch for a higher then normal operating temperature. if it is not excessive (say 15 deg or so) you most likely will... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Tru Grease CC2
Registered Member it is advertised as a high temperature grease with very good anticorrosion properties under high temperature operation. the manufacturer is reluctant to give details as regards composition, from the high dropping point (300 deg C) it may be derived that the grease thickener used is no standard metal soap. it is quite different from a standard HD mulipurpose grease as used for the applications mentioned. maybe it can be used, but i certainly would not use it in applications where long term... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Bearing Cleaner
Registered Member Thank you John [ more ]
Registered Member At http://www.skf.com/group/produ...-cleaning/index.html SKF states The term "white spirit" is typically referring to the mineral spirits available at paint stores, although in the industrial environment I think it can be purchased in larger size containers and also at a higher purity level, which might be desired. I seem to remember having also used a product called mineral turpentine a long time back. Many of the products used years ago have been declared carcinogenic over the passage of... [ more ]
Registered Member we never used it,but i find many product provided on internet.why you don't choose one to contact? [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
about oil sample bottle size
Registered Member Hello, I remember already anyway thanks for reminding me, Thanks, Darwinred [ more ]
Registered Member hello: I remember I already post a thread(CJC company)to you. you can study it and compare situation of your plant. [ more ]
Registered Member thanks john, I saw your many post, you are expert in my mind. I asked new lab(SGS),they said they use automatic instrument, the tool can get oil exactly,just oil cleanliness need more oil, other item a little oil is enough to analyse. they also said former supplier use manual tool to do analysis,so need more oil. for me I just wonder if SGS said is true,because we will sign 2 years contract with them. [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Bearing failed: oil emulsification effect
Registered Member emulsification means a very thin oil layer around water droplets. that is not very likely in this case as you do not report the presence of water. also gear oils do not emulsify easily. maybe you mean air intrusion within the oil? aeration of the lubricant will surely reduce film strength quite a bit and may lead to (rapid) failure. however, you also report spinning of the inner race on the shaft. that to me seems a far more likely cause for the damage that occurred. are you sure the fit of... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Synthetic oil instead mineral oil
Registered Member sathappan, I suggest you go back and read the thread at http://maintenanceforums.com/e...451/m/6711069492/p/2 . My comments there I think address the use of synthetic oil in the presence of moisture in a cooling tower, something I highly recommend. I note that at the end of that thread, which was started on 29 January 2007 and you added to it this past May, you posed the exact same question and there were no responses to your inquiry about power conservation using a synthetic, which I will... [ more ]
Registered Member whether you may see a significant reduction in motor power needed depends on the quality of the present lubrication. if the oil used now is able to sustain a suitable film thickness under all operating conditions, you may not see any difference. if however the load on the gears is such that there is partly mixed lubrication a synthetic oil of the poly alkelene glycol variety may make some difference, because it's adherence to steel surfaces is better then with mineral oils. usually the... [ more ]
Registered Member * motor power reduction may be not significant * On my case, as long as your CT gearboxes lubricating oil are not contaminated by water, the use of synthetic oil will help to extend the period of oil replacemet interval. That means, we reduce the consumption of oil it self, as well as man power cost to do PM of oil replacement [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Oxidation Rate Increases with Temperature
Registered Member Gentlemen, Thank you very much for your time and your contribution to my question. I realize that there is some reading/researching that I need to get started on to better grasp the thoughts that you have put forward. Once again, your contributions are appreciated. On another note Electricpete, did you ever solve your problem with the High levels of Phosphorous in your Turbine Oil? Thanks [ more ]
Registered Member Thanks, I understand what you mean now. I have seen a minimum temperature applied also. [ more ]
Registered Member not that i know of, but maybe some proprietary tests could be designed that correlate well with actual practice. the 100 deg C is arbitrary - most applications run on a lower temperature, whereas for example engine oils and oils for automatic transmissions may run at much higher temperatures. as far as i know it is more or less a rule of thumb: "above 100 deg C every 10 deg C temperature increase will double the rate of oxidation". no doubt there might be a more scientific type of... [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Oil analysis for new oil
Registered Member thank you ,I get it [ more ]
Registered Member I would include RPVOT in the test slate of a new (unused) baseline sample. It's always good to have the info in hand just in case. Cheap insurance. I also like to take a sample fairly quickly after an oil change and the unit has some run time to look and see what maybe going on. For example quite often a resevoir cleaning is not a effective as advertized so you might have carryover of cleaning fluid or residual contaminants such as dirt or varnish. [ more ]
Registered Member It is a lubricating oil condition test. = Rotating Pressure Vessel Oxidation Test. The test accelerates the oxidisation process in the oil with the aid of pressure, temperature and a copper catalyst to simulate ageing or the oil. The time taken for the pressure to drop a specified amount in the pressure vessel is then reported in minutes (equates to a given consumption of oxygen). [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
Analysis lab's responsibilities: what should be expected?
Registered Member Remember that the lube supplier has a window of +- 10 % on their blending of an ISO grade viscosity oil. In this case the refinery could supply an oil with a viscosity of between 288 and 352 viscosity although I've never seen that large of a swing it's possible. If the batches differ I would expect a different viscosity. No 2 blends are the same. [ more ]
Registered Member what exactly is your problem? ISO 320 means 320 mm2/s at 40 deg C plus or minus 10%. All the samples thus represent a ISO VG 320 oil. When the bulk tank that the samples are taken from is not constantly agitated, you may well experience some variance in viscosity - the way the samples were taken can have a large influence on the values observed also. As far as the lab is concerned: they just analyze what is supplied to them - and if that varies, so will the results. The method of viscosity... [ more ]
Registered Member No reply was offered. The worst part about lab inconsistencies is the stress it puts on the lubrication vendor and end users relationship. Especially if both use a different lab. Now throw in a third party lab that both agree upon and when the results come back skewed, where can you go from there? After all an ISO 220 is an ISO 220 and should pass the same test no matter what lab is testing but in the scenario just laid out, who’s lab has the final decision when it comes to warranty issues? [ more ]
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Asset Condition ManagementPosts About Lubrication and Oil Analysis
ISO Symbol and Color
Registered Member is there are a website that I can check the International Symbol and color of lubricants. [ more ]
Registered Member It is true John by working through a lubrication vendor they offer mapping through this it can reduced the inventory of lubricants and labeling of lube point, it can give a lot of information for each label using shapes and colors like what lubricants, synthetic or mineral, viscosity, food grade or not all of this in small label, it can prevent mixing of lubricant and I'm looking if there are International standard symbol of grease and oil. [ more ]
Registered Member I have spent a lot of time in an assortment of plants and I am unaware of any such system. Searching for an identification system, something formulated by ISO or API, yields nothing except for engine lubricants. Related info, MSDS sheets have been around since the early 1980's. When they were implementated at a former employer, we found that by working through a lubrication vendor, we were able to significantly reduce the number of products used. That may be a better use of resources. Ask... [ more ]
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